LEARNING

Learning Resources

All our current Teachers’ Notes and Students’ Worksheets needed for your visit to Hall Place are included in this section.

You will need to download and read the Booking Pack. You will also need to download the relevant notes and worksheets for the session you have booked to print and bring them with you. We are unable to print worksheets on the day of your visit. You will also find risk assessments here.

School Visits Booking Pack
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Environmental Sessions

Grow your own veggies or dress up as a butterfly! Pick the session that suits you the most. Also learn about Mr L Newman and his son Hugh who were world famous lepidopterists and had a butterfly farm in Old Bexley from 1890s – 1960s. These resources provide information about the symmetry of butterflies, their life cycle and their place in the wider environment. Risk Assessments also include visiting Bexley Butterfly House and Jambs Owls Experience.

HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW – SUMMER

HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW – WINTER

MR NEWMAN’S BEAUTIFUL BUTTERFLIES

Risk Assessments for Bexley Butterfly House and Jambs Owls Experience are included in the assessments listed above.

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Bexley: The Slavery Connection

These Teachers’ Resource Notes offer a history of Bexley’s connections with the Transatlantic Slave Trade and a set of teaching activities using the Bexley Museum and Archive Collections. We also have a loans box to support this subject in the classroom. Both offer advice on teaching this emotive area of history.

This resource was developed in collaboration with local historian Cliff Pereira internationally renowned for his work on Black and Asian history and the Bexley African Caribbean Community Association (BACCA) in 2007.

This often neglected but integral part of British, African and West Indian history is relevant to all of Bexley’s residents, it shows the impact of the Transatlantic Slave Trade on the borough in which we live.  These resources acknowledge those who were involved with the trade as well as those who fought and campaigned against it, including the enslaved Africans themselves.

These resources also discuss the impact and legacies of the Transatlantic Slave Trade including racism.

Please note the Sections 4 and 5 use images already downloaded with Sections 1-3. See Teacher’s Resource Pack for details.