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Historic House 2018-10-31T14:36:48+00:00

EXPLORE

Historic House

Hall Place is a Grade I listed country house built in 1537. A rare example of its type, many of the original features remain today. These include the distinctive checkerboard style of masonry crafted from flint and rubble, the beautiful 17th century redbrick courtyard and the spectacular plaster ceiling in the Great Chamber added around the same time.

Visitors to Hall Place and Gardens have the opportunity to explore all of these fascinating parts of the building along with the Tudor Discovery Gallery, a space for families to learn more about one of the most well known parts about English History.

Alongside the grandeur of the Great Hall, Tudor Kitchen, Great Chamber and Hallway, which are open to visitors to explore and learn more about how the many different occupants lived in these spaces, there are also three permanent displays shown below.

Codename Santa Fe: The Secret Wartime History of Hall Place

Codename Santa Fe: The Secret Wartime History of Hall Place explores how American soldiers stationed at Hall Place – code name Santa Fe – intercepted encoded messages sent by the Germans. GI veterans’ memories and declassified files reveal the importance of their round-the-clock, top-secret work, which helped defeat, the Nazis.

Faces of the Great War

Faces of the Great War, which is on show until March 2019, focuses on the thousands of First World War soldiers who came back from France with terrible facial injuries and how these injuries were treated in the new, Queen Mary Hospital in nearby Sidcup. Telling the story of New Zealand-born surgeon, Harold Gillies, the exhibition focuses on his recruitment of the pioneers of plastic surgery, told from the point of view of the medical staff and their patients and the artists used to rebuild the men’s faces.

Tudor Discovery Gallery

The Tudor Discovery Gallery is filled with hands-on interactive displays for children of any age. Discover what life was like on the Hall Place estate in Tudor times by completing puzzles, dressing up, playing board games, brass rubbing and much more.

You can also find out more about Tudor explorers in the garden’s main glasshouse where you can view some of the plants they brought back to Britain.